Flocking to Kraków

In less than five days, the fourth annual Flock conference will take place in Kraków, Poland. This is Fedora’s premier contributor event each year, alternately taking place in North America and Europe. Attendance is completely free for anyone at all, so if you happen to be in the area (maybe hanging around after World Youth Day going on right now), you should certainly stop in!

This year’s conference is shaping up to be a truly excellent one, with a massive amount of exciting content to see. The full schedule has been available for a while, and I’ve got to say: there are no lulls in the action. In fact, I’ve put together my schedule of sessions I want to see and there are in fact no gaps in it. That said, here are a few of the sessions that I suspect are going to be the most exciting:

Aug. 2 @11:00 – Towards an Atomic Workstation

For a couple of years now, Fedora has been at the forefront of developing container technologies, particularly Docker and Project Atomic. Now, the Workstation SIG is looking to take some of those Project Atomic technologies and adopt them for the end-user workstation.

Aug. 2 @17:30 – University Outreach

I’ve long held that one of Fedora’s primary goals should always be to enlighten the next generation of the open source community. Over the last year, the Fedora Project began an Initiative to expand our presence in educational programs throughout the world. I’m extremely interested to see where that has taken us (and where it is going next).

Aug. 3 @11:00 – Modularity

This past year, there has been an enormous research-and-development effort poured into the concept of building a “modular” Fedora. What does this mean? Well it means solving the age-old Too Fast/Too Slow problem (sometimes described as “I want everything on my system to stay exactly the same for a long time. Except these three things over here that I always want to be running at the latest version.”). With modularity, the hope is that people will be able to put together their ideal operating system from parts bigger than just traditional packages.

Aug. 3 @16:30 – Diversity: Women in Open Source

This is a topic that is very dear to my heart, having a daughter who is already finding her way towards an engineering future. Fedora and many other projects (and companies) talk about “meritocracy” a lot: the concept that the best idea should always win. However the technology industry in general has a severe diversity problem. When we talk about “meritocracy”, the implicit contract there is that we have many ideas to choose from. However, if we don’t have a community that represents many different viewpoints and cultures, then we are by definition only choosing the best idea from a very limited pool. I’m very interested to hear how Fedora is working towards attracting people with new ideas.