OpenShift and SSSD Part 3: Extended LDAP Attributes

Overview

This is the third post in a series on setting up advanced authentication mechanisms with OpenShift Origin. This entry will build upon the foundation created earlier, so if you haven’t already gone through that tutorial, start here and continue here.

Configuring Extended LDAP Attributes

Prerequisites

  • SSSD 1.12.0  or later. This is available on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7.0 and later.
  • mod_lookup_identity 0.9.4 or later. The required version is not yet available on any released version of Red Hat Enterprise Linux 7, but RPMs for this platform are available from upstream at this COPR repository until they arrive in Red Hat Enterprise Linux.

Configuring SSSD

First, we need to ask SSSD to look up attributes in LDAP that it normally doesn’t care about for simple system-login use-cases. In the OpenShift case, there’s really only one such attribute: email. So we need to modify the [domain/DOMAINNAME] section of /etc/sssd/sssd.conf on the authenticating proxy and add this attribute:

[domain/example.com]
...
ldap_user_extra_attrs = mail

Next, we also have to tell SSSD that it’s acceptable for this attribute to be retrieved by apache, so we need to add the following two lines to the [ifp] section of /etc/sssd/sssd.conf as well:

[ifp]
user_attributes = +mail
allowed_uids = apache, root

Now we should be able to restart SSSD and test this configuration.

# systemctl restart sssd.service

# getent passwd <username>
username:*:12345:12345:Example User:/home/username:/usr/bin/bash

# gdbus call \
        --system \
        --dest org.freedesktop.sssd.infopipe \
        --object-path /org/freedesktop/sssd/infopipe/Users/example_2ecom/12345 \
        --method org.freedesktop.DBus.Properties.Get \
        "org.freedesktop.sssd.infopipe.Users.User" "extraAttributes"
(<{'mail': ['username@example.com']}>,)

Configuring Apache

Now that SSSD is set up and successfully serving extended attributes, we need to configure the web server to ask for them and to insert them in the correct places.

First, we need to install and enable the mod_lookup_identity module for Apache (See note in the “Prerequisites” setting for installing on RHEL 7):

# yum -y install mod_lookup_identity

Second, we need to enable the module so that Apache will load it. We need to modify /etc/httpd/conf.modules.d/55-lookup_identity.conf and uncomment the line:

LoadModule lookup_identity_module modules/mod_lookup_identity.so

Next, we need to let SELinux know that it’s acceptable for Apache to connect to SSSD over D-BUS, so we’ll set an SELinux boolean:

# setsebool -P httpd_dbus_sssd on

Then we’ll edit /etc/httpd/conf.d/openshift-proxy.conf and add the following lines (bolded to show the additions) inside the <ProxyMatch /oauth/authorize> section:

  <ProxyMatch /oauth/authorize>
    AuthName openshift

    LookupOutput Headers
    LookupUserAttr mail X-Remote-User-Email
    LookupUserGECOS X-Remote-User-Display-Name

    RequestHeader set X-Remote-User %{REMOTE_USER}s env=REMOTE_USER
 </ProxyMatch>

Then restart Apache to pick up the changes.

# systemctl restart httpd.service

Configuring OpenShift

The proxy is now all set, so it’s time to tell OpenShift where to find these new attributes during login. Edit the /etc/origin/master/master-config.yaml file and add the following lines to the identityProviders section (new lines bolded):

  identityProviders:
  - name: sssd
  challenge: true
  login: true
  mappingMethod: claim
  provider:
    apiVersion: v1
    kind: RequestHeaderIdentityProvider
    challengeURL: "https://proxy.example.com/challenging-proxy/oauth/authorize?${query}"
    loginURL: "https://proxy.example.com/login-proxy/oauth/authorize?${query}"
    clientCA: /etc/origin/master/proxy/proxyca.crt
    headers:
    - X-Remote-User
    emailHeaders:
    - X-Remote-User-Email
    nameHeaders:
    - X-Remote-User-Display-Name

Go ahead and launch OpenShift with this updated configuration and log in to the web as a new user. You should see their full name appear in the upper-right of the screen. You can also verify with oc get identities -o yaml that both email addresses and full names are available.

Debugging Notes

OpenShift currently only saves these attributes to the user at the time of the first login and doesn’t update them again after that. So while you are testing (and only while testing), it’s advisable to run oc delete users,identities --all to clear the identities out so you can log in again.

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